After 2,000 Years, Scientists Learn How One Chinese Herbal Medicine Works

After 2,000 Years, Scientists Learn How One Chinese Herbal Medicine Works
After 2,000 Years, Scientists Learn How One Chinese Herbal Medicine Works

[dropcap]S[/dropcap]cientists in the United States on Sunday offered a molecular-level explanation for how a Chinese herbal medicine used for more than 2,000 years tackles fever and eases malaria.

The herb is an extract of the root of a flowering plant called blue evergreen hydrangea, known in Chinese as chang shan and in Latin as Dichroa febrifuga Lour.

Chang shan’s use dates back to the Han dynasty of 206 BC to 220 AD, according to ancient documents recording Chinese oral traditions.

In 2009, researchers made insights into its active ingredient, febrifuginone, which can be pharmaceutically made as a molecule called halofuginone.

They found that halofuginone prevented production of rogue Th17 immune cells which attack healthy cells, causing inflammation that leads to fever.

A study published in the journal Nature on Sunday found halofuginone worksbyhamperingproduction